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eastafricaart:

Francis Nnaggenda, ‘Don’t look behind’ - Sculpture / Wood-Silver

Source: kentaro-art.com
Photo Set

eastafricaart:

Sam Ntiro   (Tanzania, 1923-1993)

Top: Working on a Winding Road

Bottom: Log-cutting in the Forest

Source: stevenson.info
Link

http://eastafricaart.tumblr.com/post/81220233109/now-you-depart-and-though-your-way-may-lead

eastafricaart:

Now you depart, and though your way may lead

Through airless forests thick with hagar trees,

Places steeped in heat, stifling and dry,

Where breath comes hard, and no fresh breeze can reach

Yet may God place a shield of coolest air

Between your body and the assailant sun.

And in a…

Source: wardheernews.com
Photo
Photo Set

africanartagenda:

Geoffrey Ernest Katantazi Mukasa

Country: Uganda

Style: Contemporary, Cubism

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf

Geoffrey Mukasa was born in 1954 in Mulago, in the center of Kampala, the capital of Uganda to one of Uganda’s most prominent doctors.  He grew up at in the palace of Kabaka, who at the time was the regional King of Buganda.  Many people expected Mukasa to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a doctor.  The murder of his father during Idi Amin’s coup brought drastic changes to his life, including leaving Uganda and studying art.  He studied for a short while in Kenya before deciding to go to India.

He studied at Lucknow University from 1978 and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from Lucknow University, India in 1984.  India greatly inspired Mukasa, exposing himself to European and Indian aesthetic values.  He threw himself into his work with vigor, focusing mainly on human relationships with the environment, interactions between humans and every day living.

- See more at: http://www.wanderingeducators.com/artisans/artisan-month/artist-month-geoffrey-ernest-katantazi-mukasa.html#.dpuf

(via eastafricaart)

Source: africanartagenda
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newyorker:

A cartoon by Bruce Eric Kaplan. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/19pATON

Source: newyorker.com
Quote

"give your daughters difficult names. give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. my name makes you want to tell me the truth. my name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right."

- warsan shire. (via afrosandpeeptoes)

(via punch-in-the-face-poetry)

Source: afrosandpeeptoes